Restoring Meaning to Our Lives

This talk was given in the Online Weekly Dharma Practice Gathering on May 22, 2020.  Drawing on Joanna Macy’s four R’s to cultivate a life-sustaining culture–Resilience, Relinquishment, Restoration, and Reconciliation, Rebecca encouraged practitioners to reflect on what we have learned from spending time at home during the pandemic to restore meaning in our lives.

Letting Go of Our Search for Absolute Safety

This talk was given in the weekly online Dharma practice gathering on May 15, 2020.  Rebecca drew on Pema Chodron’s quote “To seek for some lasting security is futile” to examine how our entrenched habits to search for absolute safety is suffering.  She explained how to cultivate awareness of these habits.  Through practice, we learn to let go of the urge to grasp for absolute safety, hence allowing us to clearly discern the constantly changing situation of the pandemic to identify appropriate actions and not be stuck in fear.

Recognizing and Learning from the Bodhisattvas around us

This talk was given in the weekly online Dharma practice gathering on May 8, 2020.  Rebecca shared the practice of recognizing the Bodhisattvas around us as a way to familiarize ourselves with and cultivate Bodhisattva practices.  She explained what it means to be a Bodhisattva using the story of Rhonda Roland Shearer distributing personal protective equipment to healthcare workers featured in the Washington Post.  To support her work, click here.

Practicing as a Bodhisattva in the Pandemic

On April 27, 2020, Rebecca joined practitioners of Buddhist Sangha of Bucks County as originally scheduled on Zoom for an evening of practice.  In response to practitioners’ interest in learning about “Bodhisattva’s wise response in the face of a pandemic,” Rebecca spoke about how to practice as a Bodhisattva by not turning away from suffering.

Practicing to Suffer Better

This talk was given in the weekly online Dharma practice gathering with Rebecca Li on April 24, 2020.  Rebecca encouraged practitioners to cultivate clear awareness of one’s experience of suffering so that one can use the practice to mitigate the impulse to inflict  additional suffering on oneself and others.  To do so, we practice not being afraid of our fear and suffering.  Practicing this way, we also learn to tread the Bodhisattva Path by not turning away from the suffering of the world.